Re: Standard density -reg

From: Jeff Comer (jeffcomer_at_gmail.com)
Date: Wed Oct 24 2018 - 15:50:32 CDT

 "If I am measuring water density (mass of water /(volume of the system
-volume of silicon nitride)), then it gives 1 g/cm^3"

This sounds like the correct way to calculate the density of water. And you
get the correct answer. I'm not sure what the problem is.

Silicon nitride has a higher mass density than water (
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon_nitride ), so if you include it in
the calculation you will get a density in between the density of water and
the density of silicon nitride.

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Jeffrey Comer, PhD
Assistant Professor
Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine
Nanotechnology Innovation Center of Kansas State
Kansas State University
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Phone: 785-532-6311
Website: http://jeffcomer.us

On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 2:11 AM Mani Kandan <manikandand5110_at_gmail.com>
wrote:

> Dear all,
>
> I solvated silicon nitride nanopore and ran NPT simulation for 1
> ns. I measured the density of the system, it shows as 1.9g/cm^3. It has to
> give standard density of 1g/cm^3. What is the reason for deviating from
> standard density? If I am measuring water density (mass of water /(volume
> of the system -volume of silicon nitride)), then it gives 1 g/cm^3. Can I
> take this system reaches standard density or not? If not then what can I do
> get standard density.
>
>
> MANIKANDAN D
>

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